Run in partnership with Engineers Without Borders South Africa, UK and the USA the Engineering for People Design Challenge encourages university students to broaden their awareness of the social, environmental and economic implications of their engineering solutions. Taught through a project-based learning pedagogy, the initiative embeds a globally responsible awareness during a pivotal moment in the student’s career. Since launching in 2011, close to 50,000 students have participated from institutions in South Africa, UK, Ireland and the US.

During the final stages of the competition, students who have considered the social, environmental and economic impacts of their designs most effectively are invited to the pitching phase to present to a professional panel of judges. The top teams from this phase are entered into the final phase where a further panel of judges pick the winning and runners up award winners. These teams will be awarded during the national Grand Finals event.

Below you can find links to the workspaces which host all of the top designs as the students enter the pitching round. On this platform, you can also access the People’s Prize vote. This is a public vote where after reading through the student submission we invite you to vote on the design which you believe has most effectively considered the social, environmental and economic impacts of their design. The national winner of the People’s Prize will also be announced during the Grand Finals event.

If you are a student click on your relevant national organisation and upload your team’s design idea and if you are a member of the public we invite you to explore this year’s design ideas and vote in the People’s Prize. 

Judges biographies

Explore our international panel of judges and speakers who are supporting this year’s Grand Finals events around the world.

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South Africa student ideas

You’ll be able to explore these ideas next year!

UK student ideas

Explore this year’s cohort of student designs.

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USA student ideas

Explore this year’s cohort of student designs.

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